A radon test is the only way to determine       if there is radon in your home.

          The U.S. Office of the Surgeon General and U.S. EPA recommend that all homes be tested for radon, especially if you are buying, selling or building a home.

Testing can be done using a EPA approved "do-it-yourself" kit.
 Radon levels fluctuate by a small degree with the seasons. Short term tests can provide seasonal levels and long term tests can tell you what the homes average year round levels are.
Radon test devices are placed in the lowest occupied level of the home.

questions about indoor air quality?

 The only surefire way to know if you have radon  is to test for it. Simple easy to use test kits can be purchased at most any hardware store and usually sold for 10$-20$. This type of test, properly performed will give a reading that  determine the concentration of radon.

Colorado is known for having particularly high levels of radon due to the naturally occurring mineral rich environment namely the presence of uranium. 

What is Radon?

When Charles and I bought our first home we tested for radon.








 -  We were 3x over the EPA action level.

Now  we have a sub-slab radon

   reduction system.


-  We shared our remediation plan with our     neighbors. They also tested and now we have a radon free neighborhood. 



WE CAN HELP!

"A healthy home is a radon free home "

Air quality services

Environmental Testing

" Environmental Testing offers

   Certified Radon Mitigation & Air Quality      for your health! "


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how do i know if i have it?

Scientists agree that radon causes lung cancer in humans

              Radon has been found in dangerous concentrations in buildings and low areas such as basements and crawl spaces.  Homes have a natural vacuum that draws in radon from the ground.  In winter months the heat inside a home creates an exacerbated version of this vacuum  and pulls in even higher concentrations of radon into the living space.

Radon is capable of getting into the water supply especially if the water is drawn from a ground source.


We are proud to know our home is now a healthy one! 

Starling Designz COPYRIGHT ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2016 ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING

what can i do about it?

. Once a test has performed the levels will determine if a home would require radon mitigation. As you can see from the diagram below any level of radon over 1.0 picocuries harmful to humans and pets.  The level may also help determine the urgency of radon mitigation. The two most common types of mitigation are determined by how the home was built details and mitigation process are outlined in the gallery.

"A radon free home is a healthy home "

How does radon enter my home?

Test Kits Can be found at most all hardware stores or ordered online.

NOTE: If not initially covered in the cost of the kit

a lab processing fee may be required.

Radon is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, radioactive gas.

            As thorium and uranium naturally decay into lead, radon is produced. As radon continues to radioactively decay its particles interact with our environment and bodies.

            Breathing in these radioactive particles increases our the risk of developing lung cancer.             In addition to being a known carcinogenic, studies using human cells have noted that radon causes cellular & chromosome damage. Radon is considered a significant contaminant that affects indoor air quality worldwide. The  United States Environmental Protection Agency says radon exposure is the second most frequent cause of lung cancer.



Call Us!


We have been installing EPA certified  Radon Mitigation Systems in Colorado for over 20 years.

We pride ourselves in providing the most efficiently engineered radon reduction systems

for all size homes, commercial buildings, municipal and government facilities.

Utilizing all standard and advanced mitigation equipment, EPA certified materials and  Radon Mitigation Standards in every installation we make sure your new system makes your space a healthy space.





- Ken Wyrick

- NIH National Cancer Institute Report :" Radon & Cancer "